Amir Khan · Portfolio

Lobby Display

Quickly find a meeting or available room on your campus

Time

Feb 2019 - Present

In Progress
Role

Research, user flows, wireframe, prototype

Company and Team

Extron Electronics

Project Manager, User Experience , Visual Design, Engineering

Product

Touch-capable Display

Enterprise Scheduling Management System

Product Need

People in large collaboration spaces, university campuses, or unfamiliar meeting areas often find themselves walking around looking for their end location one-by-one. xtron wants to extend its small room scheduling panel to accomodate lobbies and give an overview of the daily calendar as a whole.

OPPORTUNITIES

Create an at-a-glace view of room calendars

Optimize the designs for touch-and non-touch programs

Design the enterprise set-up application while working on the consumer-facing lobby display

Create an ecosystem for a variety of products

Processes

  • Understand (Research and Empathize)
  • Define Pain Points
  • Ideate
  • Test
  • Refine
  • Handoff

Understanding the User

My colleague, Hannah, and I created a research and product validation plan ranging to test an early prototype. First, we took a couple of days to work on a Hypothesis Journey Map with the Project Manager. Over the course of a week, we were able to conduct user interviews and usability tests with non-technical users who often organize and conduct meetings on and off-campus. The following week, we validated the Journey Map using research, and moved around stages and steps the user took to accomplish their goals.

We discovered that users would often take time preparing for their meetings when going off-campus, and would only be encouraged to look at lobby displays if a receptionist or clear directions were not immediately available. People indentified their meetings primarily by the meeting name, or the room name. When looking for available rooms, users would often just look inside rooms to see if people were inside, and would only rely on their calendar systems for booking.

In the usability studies, the users first wanted to orient themselves in the space. Curiously, 50% of the users thought that the display was not touchable until directed to in their tasks. 100% of users did not find wayfinding functionality valuable, and mentally mapped out walkable paths. Most users suggested that they would not use the display to find upcoming meeting spaces, but would expect the display to book rooms if available.

Ideation

Ideation took approximately 5 months between a two secondary UX designers, and balancing other priority project deadlines. To design the customer-facing interface (Lobby Display) and the enterprise scheduling application (Room Agent), we scoped out the project into three phases:

  1. Configuration of the lobby display in Room Agent
  2. Non-touch interface with a list and map views
  3. List and map setup in Room Agent
  4. Touchable versions of the list and map views
  5. Setup for touchable interface in Room Agent

I was the lead on the project, and coordinated with Audrey, another UX colleague, to divide and conquer the deliverables. We held daily meetings with the project manager, and I relayed consistent updates to the developers.

Lobby Display

While I optimized the list versions of the design, Audrey worked on the map. The project manager and develepors gave constant feedback regarding product goals, and gave technical knowledge about how the system works. We became familar with the limitations of the program, and found find workarounds to problems such as not being able to upload PDFs, no support for scrolling, pinch to zoom, etc. I leveraged two main user goals in the design:

  • Finding a room to meet right now
  • Looking for their meeting that is about to start
Room Agent

We went through tens of iterations for each step of the setup. It was convenient bouncing off ideas with another UX designer, and we often found similar solutions for workflows, or reached an optimal design via compromise and competitive analysis of other systems that operated similarly.

Usability Studies

Study 1

Throughout the project, I recruited internal participants for usability studies. For Room Agent, I tested the workflow of adding lobby display devices to Room Agent, and higher-level setup workflows. The lobby display was easier and simpler to test, as we built off of the existing data for the TouchLink Scheduler (the smaller panels).

  • Users enjoyed the consistency and familiarity of the Room Agent setup process
  • 80% users failed to find the first available meeting
  • All of the users utilized meeting titles to identify their meeting, regardless of the task given.

Time on task and task success rates were used to measure user success metrics. Trends were obvious when using a graph and pie charts to compare data between participants in Excel.

Study 2

Over the next two days, I socialized the pain points with the team, and created a design fixing the most obvious pain points. I recruited another 5 participants to test the updated designs.

  • 100% users successfully found the first available meeting
  • With enough time, users were able to find their meetings successfully.
  • Users were easily able to identify meeting organizers.

Comparison

A generic square placeholder image with rounded corners in a figure.
Before
A generic square placeholder image with rounded corners in a figure.
After

Current Progress

  1. Configuration of the lobby display in Room Agent
  2. Non-touch interface with a list and map views
  3. List and map setup in Room Agent
  4. Touchable versions of the list and map views
  5. Setup for touchable interface in Room Agent
  6. Last Handoff to Visual Design